Unhappy With Employee Performance?

When I was a young manager, and I found myself frustrated with the performance of my team, I quickly blamed those members on my team. If they were not giving me what I expected from them, it must be their fault, right?

I continued with that line of reasoning for quite some time. I found myself more and more frustrated with certain (underperforming) employees and when those employees were no longer working for me, I was sometimes surprised that the “new” employees were turning out to be no better than the ones they replaced.

Then I went to work for a man who made sure I understood his way of looking at underperforming employees. What he taught me changed the whole way I managed people.

His philosophy was that there are five reasons why employees are not performing up to their manager’s expectations:

  1. The employee is not clear on what is expected of them
  2. The employee does not know how to do what is expected of them
  3. The employee has something preventing them from doing what is expected of them
  4. The employee cannot do what is expected of them
  5. The employee will not do what is expected of them

Let’s break each one down.

Reason 1: The employee is not clear on what is expected of them

If the employee is not clear on what is expected of them, who is to blame for that? Is it the employee’s fault? No! You as a manager are supposed to make sure your employees know what is expected of them.

Reason 2: The employee does not know how to do what is expected of them

If the employee is not trained enough to be able to perform at the level expected of them, who is responsible for training? The employee? No again! You as a manager need to provide your employees with the training needed to be able to perform their job.

Reason 3: The employee has something preventing them from doing what is expected of them

If there is something (or possibly someone) getting in the employee’s way and preventing them from performing at the expected level, is that the employee’s issue? Again, no. It is your job as a manager to work on those roadblocks for your employees.

Reason 4: The employee cannot do what is expected of them

If you find the employee is not able to do the job they are assigned to, that typically falls into the category of the employee’s capacity. If the employee cannot do their job, it is fair that they cannot keep their job. This one falls on the employee.

Reason 5: The employee will not do what is expected of them

Written by Jeff LaMott

 

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